About your Search

20130416
20130424
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8
. faa furloughs, they just kicked in. some delays now appearing late yesterday in and is around new york. this st for the first time with travelers waiting more than an hour. delays were seen at other airports in the u.s. the faa furloughs affect 47,000 employees, including nearly 13,000 air traffic controllers. experts say the first real test is today when traffic increases and you remember, you saw all these stories, even last week saying the sequester doesn't matter. >> because a lot of the stuff hasn't kicked in. now, if things don't matter this week, then you can say they really don't matter. >> so this is the test one way or the other. we're going to talk to mike boyd about all this and more. >> in economic news, a business economist says washington's budget tightening is having a minimal effect on business. 93% of those surveyed say political developments had no effect if the first quarter and 95% say they had no impact on capital spending plans. among the biggest concerns, global economic conditions and the potential for further government spending cuts and the regulatory environ
for more flight delays triggered by the sequester. some of the busiest airports fell behind schedule. faa furloughs went into effect leaving fewer air traffic controllers on the job and we have more from abc's matt gutman. >> reporter: the delays piled up in charlotte. waits up to 75 minutes at baltimore washington and at all three new york airports. >> when you have cuts like this, it's not good. it's one of the very few jobs, i think, that should not have one. >> reporter: the faa didn't mince words, blaming most of the backlog on federal budget cuts. the agency said, the crunch forced it to furlough its air traffic controllers one day every other week. it saves the agency nearly $640 million, but the faa says it could cost travelers 90-minute delays on 6,700 flights every day. and the early numbers show delays at baltimore washington anew york's laguardia, spiking fourfold over last monday. part of that could be weather related. but at other airports like philadelphia, not much change. to see for ourselves, we boarded a flight in miami for orlando. here's the confusing thing. the fligh
: the faa releasing a statement saying it will quote, be working with the airlines and using a comprehensive set of air traffic management tools to minimize the delays and impacts of lower staffing as we move into the busy summer season. do you find that reassuring? i'm not sure i do. good morning stuart. stuart varney from the fox business network. stuart couldn't we move money over from consultants and grants to help folks out in the control tower? >> let me spell out what we're talking about. $500 million this year for consultants. $474 million in wrapts grants to make communities more liveable and sustainable. obvious, question, martha, take some money out of the consultants bucket and put it into air traffic controlsers bucket to avoid delays. president says can't do that. i don't have the flexibility to target nonessentials. can't do it. so the republicans introduced a bill that would specifically give the president that flexibility, to avoid this pain. he threatened to veto it. that's where we stand this morning. more cuts are coming. more delays are coming. the president does not wan
to the viewers out west. on the first day of faa furloughs, there were delays. but the airlines saying don't blame us. the biggest delays hit los angeles international first. last night the federal aviation administration reported a staffing problem causing some arriving flights to run an average of three hours and seven minutes late. >> we're going to crater the entire system. orter: the nation's airlines and biggest pilots union say it points to troubles ahead. their plan to furlough air traffic controllers, forcing them to tay home one day every other week will bring the system to a grinding halt. >> it will be like having hurricane sandy in the north and hurricane katrina in the south at the same time. >> reporter: so they're suing the faa to postpone the furloughs but the faa says it's the only way to slash $637 million from its budget, cuts required by congress. the busiest airports are expected to take the hardest hits. maximum delays at atlanta's hartsfield-jackson could reach 3 1/2 hours. chicago's o'hare, more than two. and at new york's laguardia, nearl
-long delays because apparently the sequester is going to cause it. the f.a.a. beginning furloughs for employees, including 15,000 air traffic controllers. some say it's purely political. >> when the f.a.a. was shut down a few years ago, flights weren't affected. it seems to me like there is a request or directive out there to take steps so that passengers will be inconvenienced and that they'll call their elected officials to get them to take action. >>gretchen: some of the nation's busiest airport including in new york and washington already experiencing delays and longer wait times for security. >> real-life drama for actress reese witherspoon. the oscar winner arrested for disorderly conduct in atlanta after her husband was apparently pulled over for a d.u.i. as he was given a sobriety test reece reportedly got out of the car. the officers told her to get out of the car but she didn't listen. she said do you know my name? you'll be on the evening news. later she apologized. >>steve: is that her mug shot? >>gretchen: it was. >>steve: i think you're supposed to be looking at the
an advisory group. another thing that airline passengers might notice, longer flight delays. faa furloughing 10% of workforce because of federal spending cuts and causing delays of up to two hours at airports in los angeles, new york, and washington, d.c. our casey wian live with more on what's going on. what's going on, casey? >> reporter: wolf, another rough evening for travelers here at los angeles international airport. up to 80% of departures delayed, and 20% of arrivals, according to flightview.com. due to faa staffing issues, workforce reductions, that started sunday night. erin was on a flight sunday night from las vegas to l.a. little did she know, forced spending cuts began the same day, reducing the number of air traffic controllers on duty. the result? major flight delays. >> on an 8:25, and when i rebooked, our departure time, 1:45 a.m. a couple airline employees said it was due to fog, and a couple says it was due to sequestration. >> reporter: actually it was both according to air traffic union rep, who was working sunday night. there are four parallel runways that can operate
visitor programs certification from immigrations and forced them without being certified by the faa. according to g.a.o., 167 out of 434th flight training schools, 38% today do not have the required faa certification. i am told ice is often unaware when they revoke certification for flight training providers. i understand that ice is working with f.a.a. to thards issue. what updates and insurance consist you provide about ice's efforts to improve its communication with the f.a. toombings address this issue? >> i think we are very far along. by the way, senator, we're also moving from a new system governing institutions that educates student visa holders. this will help solve the problem. i will get to that. the silent screen process. under the present system, applicants for asylum must undergo a credible fear interview to determine whether they have a credible fear of persecution in his or her county of origin. but the officer determines that they have a credible fear, the application is a long for further consideration. this bill streamlines the process partly by allowing a screeni
suspects as brothers. 8:29, a.m., the faa closes airspace over watertown, massachusetts. logan airport remains open and open for now. bret, what is the expected develop mane we should likely see through washington throughout the day? it seems to me at the moment that police are pulling back. they're trying to figure out what happens next here in boston. as i say that, it's important to point out, we don't have cameras everywhere. and certainly we don't know what's happening outside of the view of the camera. >> that is exactly right. obviously much of boston, watertown, the surrounding areas still locked down. it is an armed and dangerous man. they're concerned about public safety. here in washington, people are being according to u.s. official and, headed to white house now to brief directly on latest developments to the boston bombings? we heard homeland security advisor had been keeping him up-to-date with all the details overnight. as i mentioned lawmakers are getting as much as they can too. the key thing, first of all, obviously as you talk about the public safety on the ground a
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8